RiskTech Forum

Basel Committee Ushers In Next Phase Of Enterprise/Integrated Risk Management

Posted: 22 February 2013  |  Source: SecondFloor


The Basel Committee, which creates regulations for banks, has published a set of principles regarding effective risk data aggregation and risk reporting, which will provide a fantastic business case for risk professionals to improve their risk frameworks. I’ve included highlights below, but you can take a look at the full report here.

The principles for effective risk data aggregation and risk reporting will be mandatory for globally systemically important banks (G-SIBs) from 2016, and the Basel Committee recommends that national regulators make them mandatory for domestically systemically important banks (D-SIBs). There are currently 29 G-SIBs, and D-SIBs will probably be the top four or five largest and/or most complex banks in each country. Beyond this, I believe the principles in the Basel document will become an industry standard by which all banks will be assessed by institutional investors and during due diligence processes for mergers and acquisitions.

The Basel Committee’s principles cover four closely related topics, and are common sense, though not easily attainable:

A couple excerpts from the report that will resonate with most practitioners explain why the principles are necessary. These explanations will come in handy as ‘I-told-you-so’ introductions to many a business case for the next steps in enterprise/integrated risk management frameworks and in business analytics at group level (because it’s ultimately the board and senior management that own this challenge):

 

Other elements within the principles that point to some solid professional challenges are:

The Basel principles for effective risk data aggregation and risk reporting might not look 100% practical for inclusion in the real world, as opposed to a wish-list paper exercise, but at SecondFloor we believe it creates the right mindset.

The Basel principles for effective risk data aggregation and risk reporting might not look 100% practical for inclusion in the real world, as opposed to a wish-list paper exercise, but at SecondFloor we believe it creates the right mindset.